Tablet of the Warriors. 7th Century A.D.   The scene depicts the capture of a noble called B’olon Yooj by ajaw Kan B’alam II in 695 A.D. The captive is tied in front of his subjugator, who wears a headdress with the image of the “War Serpent”, and also holds a spear and a flexible shield. Temple XVII.

Tablet of the Warriors. 7th Century A.D.

The scene depicts the capture of a noble called B’olon Yooj by ajaw Kan B’alam II in 695 A.D. The captive is tied in front of his subjugator, who wears a headdress with the image of the “War Serpent”, and also holds a spear and a flexible shield. Temple XVII.

  Glyphs.    These glyphs were part of an inscription which decorated the inner sanctuary of the temple. The glyphs are not presented in their original position, which was lost when the temple collapsed. Temple XVIII.

Glyphs. 

These glyphs were part of an inscription which decorated the inner sanctuary of the temple. The glyphs are not presented in their original position, which was lost when the temple collapsed. Temple XVIII.

  Tablet. 8th Century A.D.   The ruler Ahkal Mo’ Nahb’ III, “Lake of the Turtle and the Macaw” carries a large mask of an aquatic bird, which relates to the mythical foundationof Palenque. His headdress has the image of a macaw (Mo’), as an emblem of his name. Two kneeling dignitaries accompany him. The ruler holds the hand of the individual to the right, whoo was named Yajaw K’ak’, “Lord of Fire”. Tempe XIX.

Tablet. 8th Century A.D.

The ruler Ahkal Mo’ Nahb’ III, “Lake of the Turtle and the Macaw” carries a large mask of an aquatic bird, which relates to the mythical foundationof Palenque. His headdress has the image of a macaw (Mo’), as an emblem of his name. Two kneeling dignitaries accompany him. The ruler holds the hand of the individual to the right, whoo was named Yajaw K’ak’, “Lord of Fire”. Tempe XIX.

  Stucco tablet. 8th Century A.D.   The individual is U Pakal K’inch, son and heir of the ajaw Ahkal Mo’ Nahb’ III. He carries an incense bag and wears the aquatic bird mask. The text records three ceremonies that happened in 709, 711 and 714 A.D., when he was still a teenager. U Pakal K’inch inherited the throne after his father’s death, event that occurred between 736 and 742 A.D. Tempe XIX.

Stucco tablet. 8th Century A.D.

The individual is U Pakal K’inch, son and heir of the ajaw Ahkal Mo’ Nahb’ III. He carries an incense bag and wears the aquatic bird mask. The text records three ceremonies that happened in 709, 711 and 714 A.D., when he was still a teenager. U Pakal K’inch inherited the throne after his father’s death, event that occurred between 736 and 742 A.D. Tempe XIX.

  Doorjambs. 8th Century A.D.   The inscriptions in the left table, where the birth of Ahkal Mo’ Nahb III was registered (678 A.D.). The inscription also mentioned that he was the son of the noble called “Red Sky Aquatic Bird”. Later, it refers to a ritual carried out in front of the censer-gods (692 A.D.) and a ceremony related to the ballcourt (694 A.D.) The narration continues in the right tablet, where Alkal’s mother, Na Kinuuw, is mentioned. Temple XVIII.

Doorjambs. 8th Century A.D.

The inscriptions in the left table, where the birth of Ahkal Mo’ Nahb III was registered (678 A.D.). The inscription also mentioned that he was the son of the noble called “Red Sky Aquatic Bird”. Later, it refers to a ritual carried out in front of the censer-gods (692 A.D.) and a ceremony related to the ballcourt (694 A.D.) The narration continues in the right tablet, where Alkal’s mother, Na Kinuuw, is mentioned. Temple XVIII.

  Alfardas. 8th Century A.D.   The temple of the Foliated Cross was consecrated to the cult of the good K’awiil, patron of agriculture and the ruling lineage. The upper tablet registers the mythicalbirthof this deity in 2360 B.C. The narration continues in the lower tablet, which mentions the inauguration of the temple in the year 692 A.D., event that was accomplished by Kan B’alam II. The inscription adds that his parents where Pakal II and lady Ts’ak-b’u Ajaw. Temple of the Foliated Cross.

Alfardas. 8th Century A.D.

The temple of the Foliated Cross was consecrated to the cult of the good K’awiil, patron of agriculture and the ruling lineage. The upper tablet registers the mythicalbirthof this deity in 2360 B.C. The narration continues in the lower tablet, which mentions the inauguration of the temple in the year 692 A.D., event that was accomplished by Kan B’alam II. The inscription adds that his parents where Pakal II and lady Ts’ak-b’u Ajaw. Temple of the Foliated Cross.

  Scene of the Throne, south tablet. 8th Century A.D.   The scene illustrates the enthronization of Ahkal Mo’Nahb’ III in 721 A.D. The new ajaw occupies the central position, seated on a throne and attended by six subordinated noble man. He speaks to a dignitary called Janahb’ Ajaw, who offers him a badge of rulership The glyphs state that Ahkal III took the identity of the Celestial god, while Janahb’ Ajaw stand for the god Itsamnaaj. Temple XIX.

Scene of the Throne, south tablet. 8th Century A.D.

The scene illustrates the enthronization of Ahkal Mo’Nahb’ III in 721 A.D. The new ajaw occupies the central position, seated on a throne and attended by six subordinated noble man. He speaks to a dignitary called Janahb’ Ajaw, who offers him a badge of rulership The glyphs state that Ahkal III took the identity of the Celestial god, while Janahb’ Ajaw stand for the god Itsamnaaj. Temple XIX.

  The Red Queen’s Funerary Offerings. 7th Century A.D.   A mask made of malachite plaques covered this woman’s face. The green colour stood for life renovation. By using funerary masks (normally made of jade), maya rulers associated themselves to the Young Maize God, who was reborn every year. The headband and necklace are jade made. Temple XIII.

The Red Queen’s Funerary Offerings. 7th Century A.D.

A mask made of malachite plaques covered this woman’s face. The green colour stood for life renovation. By using funerary masks (normally made of jade), maya rulers associated themselves to the Young Maize God, who was reborn every year. The headband and necklace are jade made. Temple XIII.

 Front side of the  sarcophagus of K’inch Janahb’ Pakal in the Temple of Inscriptions  (he died on August 28, 683 A.D.).   The Palenque Museum offers a walk through the funerary chamber to give visitors an idea of the original monument.

Front side of the sarcophagus of K’inch Janahb’ Pakal in the Temple of Inscriptions (he died on August 28, 683 A.D.). 

The Palenque Museum offers a walk through the funerary chamber to give visitors an idea of the original monument.

 Back side of the  sarcophagus of K’inch Janahb’ Pakal in the Temple of Inscriptions  (he died on August 28, 683 A.D.).  The Palenque Museum offers a walk through the funerary chamber to give visitors an idea of the original monument.

Back side of the sarcophagus of K’inch Janahb’ Pakal in the Temple of Inscriptions (he died on August 28, 683 A.D.).

The Palenque Museum offers a walk through the funerary chamber to give visitors an idea of the original monument.

 The  Throne Panel  of Temple XXI at Palenque Chiapas.

The Throne Panel of Temple XXI at Palenque Chiapas.

 Overview about  The Palace , Palenque, Chiapas.  The Palace Tower’s construction was commissioned by K’inch Ahkal Mo’ Nahb’ III (A.D. 721-736) and his son K’inch K’uk’ B’alam II (ca. A.D. 783). Although unique in the Maya area, the function of the Tower remains unclear.

Overview about The Palace, Palenque, Chiapas.

The Palace Tower’s construction was commissioned by K’inch Ahkal Mo’ Nahb’ III (A.D. 721-736) and his son K’inch K’uk’ B’alam II (ca. A.D. 783). Although unique in the Maya area, the function of the Tower remains unclear.