Entrance to the "Mexico Section" with one of the highlight of the museum the original Aztec   "   Stone of the Sun"  in the back.     In the front left is a  Cuauhxicalli  (meaning "Eagle gourd bowl"), an altar-like stone vessel used by the Aztecs to contain human hearts extracted in sacrificial ceremonies. A cuahxicalli would often be decorated with animal motifs, commonly eagles or jaguars. 

Entrance to the "Mexico Section" with one of the highlight of the museum the original Aztec "Stone of the Sun" in the back. 

In the front left is a Cuauhxicalli (meaning "Eagle gourd bowl"), an altar-like stone vessel used by the Aztecs to contain human hearts extracted in sacrificial ceremonies. A cuahxicalli would often be decorated with animal motifs, commonly eagles or jaguars. 

 The  Teocalli of the Sacred War  (teocalli is Nahuatl for "temple"; Spanish: El Teocalli de la Guerra Sagrada) is the name given by archaeologist Alfonso Caso to a monolithic pre-Columbian miniature of an Aztec temple, thought by some to have served as a throne.   This monument was ordered by Moctezuma II to commemorate the New Fire of 1507. The symbolism relates to the cult of the sun and the idea of sacred war. The Sacred War was an institution by which victims were obtained for sacrifice in the temples. This monument was found underneath the National Palace.

The Teocalli of the Sacred War (teocalli is Nahuatl for "temple"; Spanish: El Teocalli de la Guerra Sagrada) is the name given by archaeologist Alfonso Caso to a monolithic pre-Columbian miniature of an Aztec temple, thought by some to have served as a throne. 

This monument was ordered by Moctezuma II to commemorate the New Fire of 1507. The symbolism relates to the cult of the sun and the idea of sacred war. The Sacred War was an institution by which victims were obtained for sacrifice in the temples. This monument was found underneath the National Palace.

  Tlaltecuhtli tombstone . Fine bas-relief representing the earth monster lurking in its characteristic position and head thrown back. The figure is adorned with anklets with bells and precious stones and wears a skirt decorated with skulls and crossbones.In the center is the jade or chalchihuite glyph, symbol of the preciousness.

Tlaltecuhtli tombstone. Fine bas-relief representing the earth monster lurking in its characteristic position and head thrown back. The figure is adorned with anklets with bells and precious stones and wears a skirt decorated with skulls and crossbones.In the center is the jade or chalchihuite glyph, symbol of the preciousness.

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 On the left the statue of the  Goddess Coatlicue  and on the right the sculpture image of this young god who could correspond to the representation of his son, Huitzilopochtli.

On the left the statue of the Goddess Coatlicue and on the right the sculpture image of this young god who could correspond to the representation of his son, Huitzilopochtli.

 The Aztec  Calendar Stone ,  Sun Stone ,  Piedra del Sol , or  Stone of the Five Eras  is a late Post-Classic Mexica sculpture, and is perhaps the most famous work of Aztec sculpture. The stone is 358 centimetres (11.75 ft) in diameter and 98 centimetres (3.22 ft) thick, and it weighs about 24 tons.

The Aztec Calendar StoneSun StonePiedra del Sol, or Stone of the Five Eras is a late Post-Classic Mexica sculpture, and is perhaps the most famous work of Aztec sculpture. The stone is 358 centimetres (11.75 ft) in diameter and 98 centimetres (3.22 ft) thick, and it weighs about 24 tons.

 On the right side of the original "Stone of the Sun" information are given: The one sculpture which identifies the Mexican above all others is the Stone of the Sun, discovered in December, 1790, in the Plazza Major of the capital New Spain. Because of its symbolic content, with the names of the days and the cosmogonic suns, it was incorrectly identified as the Aztec Calendar. 

On the right side of the original "Stone of the Sun" information are given: The one sculpture which identifies the Mexican above all others is the Stone of the Sun, discovered in December, 1790, in the Plazza Major of the capital New Spain. Because of its symbolic content, with the names of the days and the cosmogonic suns, it was incorrectly identified as the Aztec Calendar. 

 Xiuhcoatl. In the Mexica cosmogony, the fire serpent Xiuhcoatl constituted the principle weapon of the god-sun Huitzilopochtli. This mythic animal was in charge of leading the sun across the sky and may be indentified by its reptile body with strong lizard-like extremities, as well as a horn which protrudes from its nose.

Xiuhcoatl. In the Mexica cosmogony, the fire serpent Xiuhcoatl constituted the principle weapon of the god-sun Huitzilopochtli. This mythic animal was in charge of leading the sun across the sky and may be indentified by its reptile body with strong lizard-like extremities, as well as a horn which protrudes from its nose.

  The  Coatlicue  statue is a 2.7 metre (8.9 ft) tall andesite statue usually identified with the Aztec goddess Coatlicue ("snakes-her-skirt"), mother of earth.

The Coatlicue statue is a 2.7 metre (8.9 ft) tall andesite statue usually identified with the Aztec goddess Coatlicue ("snakes-her-skirt"), mother of earth.

 On teh top the  Deity of Death "Seven Flowers"  d below the  brazier with "Deity of Death" .

On teh top the Deity of Death "Seven Flowers" d below the brazier with "Deity of Death".

  Huastecos Priest . In some buildings with sacred enclosure, the Aztecs placed great  ceramic  figures framing entries. This is the case of these images of characters dressed in headgear and earmuffs unspun cotton, characterful mothers of Huastec origin goddesses.

Huastecos Priest. In some buildings with sacred enclosure, the Aztecs placed great ceramic figures framing entries. This is the case of these images of characters dressed in headgear and earmuffs unspun cotton, characterful mothers of Huastec origin goddesses.

 Relief of the death of the sun. The deeper meaning of fear, the end of the solar cycle, is expressed in this, unfortunately incomplete sculptural fragment, where you can see the sun, resembling a warrior who wears stellar sandals.

Relief of the death of the sun. The deeper meaning of fear, the end of the solar cycle, is expressed in this, unfortunately incomplete sculptural fragment, where you can see the sun, resembling a warrior who wears stellar sandals.

 Relief depicting a procession of warriors.

Relief depicting a procession of warriors.

  Replica of an Aztec codex.

Replica of an Aztec codex.

  Chac Mool  in front. On the underside was embossed represent the god Tlaloc adopting the crouched position of the God of Earth, Tlaltecuhtli . The figure is immersed in a water world, surrounded by snails, fish and swirls of water, among others.

Chac Mool in front. On the underside was embossed represent the god Tlaloc adopting the crouched position of the God of Earth, Tlaltecuhtli . The figure is immersed in a water world, surrounded by snails, fish and swirls of water, among others.

 Brasero warrior. The picture painted and modeled in this splendid brazier is a dead eagle warrior, as shown by the stark face and wearing ornaments like ear-shaped hands and cut necklace hands and hearts as carrying deities death.

Brasero warrior. The picture painted and modeled in this splendid brazier is a dead eagle warrior, as shown by the stark face and wearing ornaments like ear-shaped hands and cut necklace hands and hearts as carrying deities death.

  The Aztec goddess of Coatlicue ("snakes-her-skirt"), mother of earth, from the back side.

The Aztec goddess of Coatlicue ("snakes-her-skirt"), mother of earth, from the back side.

  Tenochtitlan  mural in the back and a model of the  main temple complex, the   Templo Mayor  in the front.

Tenochtitlan mural in the back and a model of the main temple complex, the Templo Mayor in the front.

  Xochipilli  was the god of art, games, beauty, dance, flowers, and song in Aztec mythology. His name contains the Nahuatl words xochitl ("flower") and pilli (either "prince" or "child"), and hence means "flower prince". As the patron of writing and painting, he was called Chicomexochitl the "Seven-flower", but he could also be referred to as Macuilxochitl "Five-flower".    

Xochipilli was the god of art, games, beauty, dance, flowers, and song in Aztec mythology. His name contains the Nahuatl words xochitl ("flower") and pilli (either "prince" or "child"), and hence means "flower prince". As the patron of writing and painting, he was called Chicomexochitl the "Seven-flower", but he could also be referred to as Macuilxochitl "Five-flower". 

 

  Xochipilli   was the god of art, games, beauty, dance, flowers, and song in Aztec mythology. His name contains the Nahuatl words xochitl ("flower") and pilli (either "prince" or "child"), and hence means "flower prince". As the patron of writing and painting, he was called Chicomexochitl the "Seven-flower", but he could also be referred to as Macuilxochitl "Five-flower". 

Xochipilli was the god of art, games, beauty, dance, flowers, and song in Aztec mythology. His name contains the Nahuatl words xochitl ("flower") and pilli (either "prince" or "child"), and hence means "flower prince". As the patron of writing and painting, he was called Chicomexochitl the "Seven-flower", but he could also be referred to as Macuilxochitl "Five-flower". 

  Xochipilli   was the god of art, games, beauty, dance, flowers, and song in Aztec mythology. His name contains the Nahuatl words xochitl ("flower") and pilli (either "prince" or "child"), and hence means "flower prince". As the patron of writing and painting, he was called Chicomexochitl the "Seven-flower", but he could also be referred to as Macuilxochitl "Five-flower". 

Xochipilli was the god of art, games, beauty, dance, flowers, and song in Aztec mythology. His name contains the Nahuatl words xochitl ("flower") and pilli (either "prince" or "child"), and hence means "flower prince". As the patron of writing and painting, he was called Chicomexochitl the "Seven-flower", but he could also be referred to as Macuilxochitl "Five-flower". 

  Replica of an Aztec codex.

Replica of an Aztec codex.

 Brasero Chicomecoatl. The red dress and headdress striking as a large cardboard box decorated with rosettes at the ends, identifies the image of this brazier Chicomecoatl, "Seven Serpent", the goddess of ripe corn.

Brasero Chicomecoatl. The red dress and headdress striking as a large cardboard box decorated with rosettes at the ends, identifies the image of this brazier Chicomecoatl, "Seven Serpent", the goddess of ripe corn.

  Ehecatl Atlantean's.  Excavations of the ladders, behind the Cathedral in Mexico City, this pair of Atlantean's with the identity of the god of wind was found.

Ehecatl Atlantean's. Excavations of the ladders, behind the Cathedral in Mexico City, this pair of Atlantean's with the identity of the god of wind was found.