Entrance to the "Beatriz de la Fuente" museum with the murals of Teotihuacan.  Over more than a century of archaeological excavations recovered in the area are shown.

Entrance to the "Beatriz de la Fuente" museum with the murals of Teotihuacan. Over more than a century of archaeological excavations recovered in the area are shown.

 Coyote with headdress. This fragment of a mural painting formed part of a procession and may have come from the Techinantitla apartment compound. It represent a coyote wit a large headdress, a necklace of green beads, and a five-pointed star on its chest. From its muzzle emerges a very elaborate speech scroll from which drops of liquid fall.

Coyote with headdress. This fragment of a mural painting formed part of a procession and may have come from the Techinantitla apartment compound. It represent a coyote wit a large headdress, a necklace of green beads, and a five-pointed star on its chest. From its muzzle emerges a very elaborate speech scroll from which drops of liquid fall.

 View of one of the exhibition rooms in Museo de los Murales Teotihuacanos.

View of one of the exhibition rooms in Museo de los Murales Teotihuacanos.

 These objects are called "Theater incensarios" because we are not sure precisely how they were used. It is important to note the use of polychrome painting characteristic of both Teotihuacan spaces and objects.

These objects are called "Theater incensarios" because we are not sure precisely how they were used. It is important to note the use of polychrome painting characteristic of both Teotihuacan spaces and objects.

 Serpent from Zacuala. There are many fragments of this mural, which was excavated by the archaeologist Laurette Sejourne. Its original position is unclear: some scholars think it should be vertical, and others think it should be horizontal. It shows the undulating body of a serpent whose body is covered with shells and green fathers. The mat pattern in the border may be an allusion to lineage.

Serpent from Zacuala. There are many fragments of this mural, which was excavated by the archaeologist Laurette Sejourne. Its original position is unclear: some scholars think it should be vertical, and others think it should be horizontal. It shows the undulating body of a serpent whose body is covered with shells and green fathers. The mat pattern in the border may be an allusion to lineage.

 Priest Impersonating Tlaloc. This fragment shows us a priest. Wearing the goggles characteristic of a god who the Mexicas (Aztecs) called Tlaloc. Because we don't know the Teotihuacan name of this god, we use the Mexica name due to how similar the deities appear in the two great Mesoamerican cultures.

Priest Impersonating Tlaloc. This fragment shows us a priest. Wearing the goggles characteristic of a god who the Mexicas (Aztecs) called Tlaloc. Because we don't know the Teotihuacan name of this god, we use the Mexica name due to how similar the deities appear in the two great Mesoamerican cultures.

 Merlon with Tlaloc Face. The god of rain and of time, Tlaloc is associated with the sun through his symbols, such as the trapezoid-and-ray headdress. Another such symbol is the nymphaea flower, commonly (and incorrectly) called water lily, in the mouth of the deity.

Merlon with Tlaloc Face. The god of rain and of time, Tlaloc is associated with the sun through his symbols, such as the trapezoid-and-ray headdress. Another such symbol is the nymphaea flower, commonly (and incorrectly) called water lily, in the mouth of the deity.

 Theater "Incensario". Its original function remains unclear. At present "Incensario" are considered symbols of abundance. The central figure is a person dresses with great richness; he has magnificent headdress. On the sides are bundles of long feathers. The base, in the form of an inverted plate, has figures of squash. Squash blossoms, tortillas, and shells appliqued on it.

Theater "Incensario". Its original function remains unclear. At present "Incensario" are considered symbols of abundance.
The central figure is a person dresses with great richness; he has magnificent headdress. On the sides are bundles of long feathers. The base, in the form of an inverted plate, has figures of squash. Squash blossoms, tortillas, and shells appliqued on it.

 Jaguar with Profile Body and frontal View Face. This fragment shows a jaguar who its body is constructed by a net; it is surrounded by glyphs, butterflies and birds.

Jaguar with Profile Body and frontal View Face. This fragment shows a jaguar who its body is constructed by a net; it is surrounded by glyphs, butterflies and birds.

 Fragment with Raptorial Birds and Coyote. Raptorial birds, identified by their large claws, are grabbing  a plant with a cob, possibly cacao. The dismembered body of a coyote lies on the left.

Fragment with Raptorial Birds and Coyote. Raptorial birds, identified by their large claws, are grabbing  a plant with a cob, possibly cacao. The dismembered body of a coyote lies on the left.

 The Teotihuacan writing system, Museo de Murales, Teotihuacan.

The Teotihuacan writing system, Museo de Murales, Teotihuacan.

 View of one of the exhibition rooms in Museo de Murales Teotihuacan.

View of one of the exhibition rooms in Museo de Murales Teotihuacan.

 Chessboard. The geometric motifs and the red-orange color of the design serve as temporal markers that set this mural in technical Phase I.

Chessboard. The geometric motifs and the red-orange color of the design serve as temporal markers that set this mural in technical Phase I.

 Jaguar with Maguey. The polychrome paintings of Technical Phase III allow us to appreciate the chromatic richness achieved thanks to the technical evolution in the process of obtaining pigments, in combination with the creation of increasingly smaller spaces for the manufacture of figures.

Jaguar with Maguey. The polychrome paintings of Technical Phase III allow us to appreciate the chromatic richness achieved thanks to the technical evolution in the process of obtaining pigments, in combination with the creation of increasingly smaller spaces for the manufacture of figures.

 Reproduction of the Portico 25 from Tetitla. This reproduction shows some of the wall paintings that can still be found at Portico and Patio 25 at Tetitla residential complex. In this rendering of the northern wall, the eagle is shown with outstretched wings.

Reproduction of the Portico 25 from Tetitla. This reproduction shows some of the wall paintings that can still be found at Portico and Patio 25 at Tetitla residential complex. In this rendering of the northern wall, the eagle is shown with outstretched wings.

 Reproduction of the Portico 25 from Tetitla. This reproduction shows some of the wall paintings that can still be found at Portico and Patio 25 at Tetitla residential complex.

Reproduction of the Portico 25 from Tetitla. This reproduction shows some of the wall paintings that can still be found at Portico and Patio 25 at Tetitla residential complex.

 Black Tlaloc. Th symbols by which one identities Tlaloc are the circles around the eyes, or "googles" and the mouth wit the corners pointing down filled with fangs, or "moustache". This figure with its black painted face has large circular goggles and alternating drops with elements that have been identified as flames.

Black Tlaloc. Th symbols by which one identities Tlaloc are the circles around the eyes, or "googles" and the mouth wit the corners pointing down filled with fangs, or "moustache". This figure with its black painted face has large circular goggles and alternating drops with elements that have been identified as flames.

 Netted Jaguar Standing on Spherical Objects. There are several fragments which came from this mural, forming a procession of felines which have a kind of net on their body. In the sections of the border preserved in some of the fragments, we see a Tlaloc effigy crowned with ears of corn.

Netted Jaguar Standing on Spherical Objects. There are several fragments which came from this mural, forming a procession of felines which have a kind of net on their body. In the sections of the border preserved in some of the fragments, we see a Tlaloc effigy crowned with ears of corn.

 Decorated Shell. This mural is known as a bivalve shell or a  festooned shell, names given to it by scholars. If we could decipher its content, it would be probably allude to water and abundance, since herons, fish and shellfish are all symbol of food.

Decorated Shell. This mural is known as a bivalve shell or a  festooned shell, names given to it by scholars. If we could decipher its content, it would be probably allude to water and abundance, since herons, fish and shellfish are all symbol of food.

 Frontal figure with Interlaces, Claws, and Streams of Water. A large, symbolic figure, represented frontally, which in the place of its face or head has a design formed by interlaces which recalls that of a shield. The personage wears an enormous and complex headdress which signals his high status. His hands are replaced by claws which grasp descending steams of water in which interior are signs like bivalve shells, hands, and elements of the god Tlaloc. 

Frontal figure with Interlaces, Claws, and Streams of Water. A large, symbolic figure, represented frontally, which in the place of its face or head has a design formed by interlaces which recalls that of a shield. The personage wears an enormous and complex headdress which signals his high status. His hands are replaced by claws which grasp descending steams of water in which interior are signs like bivalve shells, hands, and elements of the god Tlaloc. 

 Fragment of Mural Mythological Animals. Beatriz de la Fuente describes this mural: "The general subject is the confrontation or simple presence (mythical or real) of animals which hide or alternate their natural image. They move, creating an undulating rhythm between the waves of water represented by wide horizontal bands of yellow, blue, or green, which alternate, separated by thin red bands which carve upwards to from peaks at regular intervals or emerging, crossing, and encircling the scaffolding of coloured bands are three classes of zoomorphic creates: quadrupeds, reptiles, and fish. Their enormously dynamic and varied positions confer dramatic movements upon the scene".

Fragment of Mural Mythological Animals. Beatriz de la Fuente describes this mural: "The general subject is the confrontation or simple presence (mythical or real) of animals which hide or alternate their natural image. They move, creating an undulating rhythm between the waves of water represented by wide horizontal bands of yellow, blue, or green, which alternate, separated by thin red bands which carve upwards to from peaks at regular intervals or emerging, crossing, and encircling the scaffolding of coloured bands are three classes of zoomorphic creates: quadrupeds, reptiles, and fish. Their enormously dynamic and varied positions confer dramatic movements upon the scene".

 View of one of the exhibition rooms in Museo de Murales Teotihuacan.

View of one of the exhibition rooms in Museo de Murales Teotihuacan.