Building 15 is a rectangular stepped base with two upper tiers at the entrance of Bonampak. Set at the center of the lower tier's stone-slab floor is the plain stele called No. 7, on whose east side you can see the weathered lines of several hieroglyphics.

Building 15 is a rectangular stepped base with two upper tiers at the entrance of Bonampak. Set at the center of the lower tier's stone-slab floor is the plain stele called No. 7, on whose east side you can see the weathered lines of several hieroglyphics.

 Bonampak's Great Plaza is one of the most spacious in the region, measuring 90 by 110 yards. Its location as the approach to the Acropolis provides the combined whole with a sense of monumentality.

Bonampak's Great Plaza is one of the most spacious in the region, measuring 90 by 110 yards. Its location as the approach to the Acropolis provides the combined whole with a sense of monumentality.

 In the center of the Great Plaza in Bonampak are found two enormous steles, No. 1 being the archaeological site's most important one.

In the center of the Great Plaza in Bonampak are found two enormous steles, No. 1 being the archaeological site's most important one.

 The Acropolis was built upon a natural hillock, all of the north side of which was terraced into three levels.

The Acropolis was built upon a natural hillock, all of the north side of which was terraced into three levels.

 On the first level of the Acropolis were erected the largest buildings 1 or building of the paintings on the right, building 2 in the middle which, because of its size could not have supported a stone-vault roof, and building 3 on the left. 

On the first level of the Acropolis were erected the largest buildings 1 or building of the paintings on the right, building 2 in the middle which, because of its size could not have supported a stone-vault roof, and building 3 on the left. 

 Stele 2 shows us Chan Muwaan II accompanied by two woman, his mother to the front, and his wife Lady Rabbit from Yaxchilian, behind him. The scene focused on the ritual of self-sacrifice. Indeed, each personage is seen holding objects used in such rituals such as devilfish stinger and inward folded cloth or paper platters serving as receptacles for the drops of blood, and later incinerated in honor of their deities.

Stele 2 shows us Chan Muwaan II accompanied by two woman, his mother to the front, and his wife Lady Rabbit from Yaxchilian, behind him. The scene focused on the ritual of self-sacrifice. Indeed, each personage is seen holding objects used in such rituals such as devilfish stinger and inward folded cloth or paper platters serving as receptacles for the drops of blood, and later incinerated in honor of their deities.

 The scene portrays a standing Chan Muwaan II hovering over a second personage with paper ears symbolising captivity, and crouching as a sin of submission.

The scene portrays a standing Chan Muwaan II hovering over a second personage with paper ears symbolising captivity, and crouching as a sin of submission.

  The Temple of the Murals   (Building 1) is a long narrow building with 3 rooms atop a low-stepped pyramid base. The interior walls preserve the finest examples of classic Maya painting, otherwise known only from pottery and occasional small faded fragments. 

The Temple of the Murals (Building 1) is a long narrow building with 3 rooms atop a low-stepped pyramid base. The interior walls preserve the finest examples of classic Maya painting, otherwise known only from pottery and occasional small faded fragments. 

  The first room of Building 1 shows robing of priests and nobles, a ceremony to mark a child as a noble heir, an orchestra playing wooden trumpets, drums, and other instruments, and nobles conferring in discussion. 

The first room of Building 1 shows robing of priests and nobles, a ceremony to mark a child as a noble heir, an orchestra playing wooden trumpets, drums, and other instruments, and nobles conferring in discussion. 

  The first room of Building 1 shows robing of priests and nobles, a ceremony to mark a child as a noble heir, an orchestra playing wooden trumpets, drums, and other instruments, and nobles conferring in discussion. 

The first room of Building 1 shows robing of priests and nobles, a ceremony to mark a child as a noble heir, an orchestra playing wooden trumpets, drums, and other instruments, and nobles conferring in discussion. 

  The first room of Building 1 shows robing of priests and nobles, a ceremony to mark a child as a noble heir, an orchestra playing wooden trumpets, drums, and other instruments, and nobles conferring in discussion. 

The first room of Building 1 shows robing of priests and nobles, a ceremony to mark a child as a noble heir, an orchestra playing wooden trumpets, drums, and other instruments, and nobles conferring in discussion. 

  The first room of Building 1 shows robing of priests and nobles, a ceremony to mark a child as a noble heir, an orchestra playing wooden trumpets, drums, and other instruments, and nobles conferring in discussion. 

The first room of Building 1 shows robing of priests and nobles, a ceremony to mark a child as a noble heir, an orchestra playing wooden trumpets, drums, and other instruments, and nobles conferring in discussion. 

  The second room of Building 1 shows a war scene, with prisoners taken, and then the prisoners, with ritually bleeding fingers, seated before a richly-attired Chaan Muwaan II, the Yaxchilano "governor" of Bonampak. It is usually presumed that the prisoners are being prepared for  human sacrifice , though this is not actually shown in the murals.

The second room of Building 1 shows a war scene, with prisoners taken, and then the prisoners, with ritually bleeding fingers, seated before a richly-attired Chaan Muwaan II, the Yaxchilano "governor" of Bonampak. It is usually presumed that the prisoners are being prepared for human sacrifice, though this is not actually shown in the murals.

  The third room of Building 1 shows a ceremony with dancers in fine costumes wearing masks of gods, and the ruler and his family stick needles into their tongues in ritual bloodletting. The accompanying hieroglyphic text dates the scene and gives the names of the principal participants.

The third room of Building 1 shows a ceremony with dancers in fine costumes wearing masks of gods, and the ruler and his family stick needles into their tongues in ritual bloodletting. The accompanying hieroglyphic text dates the scene and gives the names of the principal participants.

  The third room of Building 1 shows a ceremony with dancers in fine costumes wearing masks of gods, and the ruler and his family stick needles into their tongues in ritual bloodletting. The accompanying hieroglyphic text dates the scene and gives the names of the principal participants.

The third room of Building 1 shows a ceremony with dancers in fine costumes wearing masks of gods, and the ruler and his family stick needles into their tongues in ritual bloodletting. The accompanying hieroglyphic text dates the scene and gives the names of the principal participants.

  The third room of Building 1 shows a ceremony with dancers in fine costumes wearing masks of gods, and the ruler and his family stick needles into their tongues in ritual bloodletting. The accompanying hieroglyphic text dates the scene and gives the names of the principal participants.

The third room of Building 1 shows a ceremony with dancers in fine costumes wearing masks of gods, and the ruler and his family stick needles into their tongues in ritual bloodletting. The accompanying hieroglyphic text dates the scene and gives the names of the principal participants.

 Sculpture under the roof of The Temple of the Murals  (Building 1) at Bonampak.

Sculpture under the roof of The Temple of the Murals (Building 1) at Bonampak.

  Bonampak's Great Plaza behind and Building 15 on the right when you leave Bonampak.

Bonampak's Great Plaza behind and Building 15 on the right when you leave Bonampak.